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turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. >>> let's take a look at u.s. futures. the last time we checked in, the dow was set to open about 11 points at the open. it's peared back just a tad. the dow is still trying to climb back towards that 14,000 level, a time, ross, when frankly more people were talking about warning signs in the market. >>> meanwhile, as far as the european stocks were concerned, and this is where we stand, firmer today. the ibex down 0.3%. the cac 40, ftse and xetra dax up between 0.25% and 0.5%. dollar index is up, kelly. >> that's right. and the dollar/yen, adding 0.5%. so 93.17. aussie/dollar weaker by about 0.5%. a lot of trade across asia is quiet or closed for the lunar new year. >>> france's problems have nothing to do with a single curren currency, but down to the problems itself. he said that the core of the french problem lies inside the cup, not in the foreign exchange rate. this time last week, the french president called for the rights to curve the euro. >>> and the euro group meeting, which is due to star today in b
the city government imposed higher loans. the kospi ended weaker by 0.5%. australia's asx 200 moved back towards its 4 1/2 year high gaining 0.8%. as we had the strong gains in retail and financial stocks. india's sensex are trading higher by about 0.25%. back to you. all right. thanks for that, sixuan. catch you later. >>> still to come on the program will be adam barcelona. taking a look at the hottest trends in the space, find out what the ceo of deutsche has to say about the challenges of taking on the american market. kelly is there. she'll join us in just a few moments. >>> the mobile world congress is under way in barcelona. there's a new hand set based on its firefox web browser for mozilla. the reason i'm on my own is because kelly is there getting all mobile and wired and super fast. hi, kel. >> ross, it is great to see you guys out here in barcelona. i wish i could say the weather is a little warmer. it's surprisingly chilly here. and the chilly economic environment across europe also having an impact. some of the bigger european and american names have skilled down their pres
driven downturn. >> and there are forecasts now. i thought it was nomura city. whichever bank, i apologize. talking about spanish gdp by 4%. >> one shouldn't exaggerate. span entered the crisis in a relatively comfortable position debtwise. the problem is, the scale of the economic downturn and the fact that the -- the costs of the bank bailout have been basically settled, have saddled spain to even higher debt. that's clearly undermined spain's creditworthiness. >> the thing is, is what we're seeing here just something that's going on in january? because with such easy money in the world and the fact that if you're a fixed income investor, real returns are negative. are we driving fixed income investors not just in the sovereign market, but, you know, they're not going to -- they can't switch out of fixed income into equity. we talk about them looking at structured credit now seems to be flying, investment grade is overvalued. i wonder if that's what's going on here, if you can find the spanish debt at 5%, it's still better than other stuff you could buy. >> what we're seeing he
quarter. maybe some positive news there. tina, from citi, she's been taking a look at what the president has to do, i guess, in his second term or what he's expected to do. what i loved was your point, how did you put it? fiscal deals or compromise tend to disappear in washington like -- >> the bermuda triangle. >> you don't have high hopes for compromise here? >> no. most politicians in the developed world, and the u.s. very much within this, it's not going to see -- i'm not going to provide fertile ground for grand bargains. politicians like to talk about it. this is their way of saying, we're ready to do a deal, but it's those guys, they won't compromise. we think we'll see more of this piecemeal last minute compromises. >> and we're fating critical issues in the u.s. people might be aware of the fiscal cliff, but there's the continuing resolution, there's the sequester that goes into effect march 1st. should we hold our breath for compromise here? and, again, the issue is being forced because these are situations in which if there's no action, something still happens. >> that's right
in this regard, i'm moving from one of the least expensive capital cities in the world, ottawa, to one of the more expensive, shall we say, capital cities in the world, london. >> would you have done the job for less? >> i was offered these terms and i accepted them. >> do you see there might be any resentment amongst staff at the level of your pay package? i'm not aware of any. >> you don't anticipate that in any way? >> i don't anticipate -- if i may say in terms of the pay package, the pay package is, if i may, properly viewed as pay pension and -- >> mark carney continuing to talk about the logistics of it as taking on the role of the head of the bank of england. we can already tell you from statements that are on the wire that he's talking a lot about the exit strategy. he's saying there are limits, you know, to changing the policy framework that the blank of england might pursue. let's bring tom vosa back in here. tom, i have to say there's a generally hawkish tenor to what we're seeing so far. we've seen the spike in the pound as a result of this. what do you make of that? >> we
of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. >>> happy valentine's day. americans will spend $18.6 billion to express their love. men tend to spend more, $176, while females spend on average $89. wow. big business. joining us know is the owner of rennie and reed forest. reed and angus, hello and welcome to you both. happy valentine's day, i should say. reed, how big a day is it for you and what are some of the more unusual requests you tend to get? >> it's a big day. whether it's the weather or whether it's clientele, we had an order yesterday for a 1,000 rose arrangement, which we'll be sending out first thing this morning. this is an individual we see a couple times throughout the last three years and it keeps us on our toes. >> i see you have the low ask lush. i thought that was something that happens at the end of valentine's day. apparently it's a mixed floral. it's popular. are guys any good at this, reed? how much are they spending on average this year compared to five years ago? >> guys are good at it because their hear
than the annual salary. the city of london, seen as a major loser in this deal. it has an estimated 150,000 staff potentially affected and i just have to say, i keep thinking i'm missing something on this story because if this actually happens, ross, the impact would be -- it would have a major impact on the city, especially at the top. what does it mean for the banks? what does it mean for the potential returns when you look at comp and return on investment for, you know, return investment capital for some of these financial names? >> look, if you're freezing pay bonuses at one times salary, which for the investment bank is quite a dramatic change, what will the reaction be? obviously, a lot of people leaving banks or you'll see -- which i suspect you'll also get an awful lot of complex pay deals coming up. >> that, too. >> and there's a lot of ways to try and get around it. >> credit suisse and some are trying to pay with derivatives. there may be different kinds of comp. but if you're talking about the best and the most talented, you could argue about that in the banking sector alway
of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. >>> italy's mario montanaty is calling on the candidates to appear in a televised debate as he's struggling to gain ground in his first ever campaign. jules is in milan. anybody nibbling at his debate idea, jules? >> well, what we've seen is that he's in fourth place behind berlusconi, behind the comedian becky grillo and wind the man that's most likely to win right now, mr. bersani of the democratic party. but i think the important thing to point out here is there's still a third of voters out there that haven't made a decision, in part because of the scandals we've had in the last few months making it difficult for people to decide. for mario monti's point of view, it can't hurt. berlusconi came out immediately and said he's not willing to face mario monti. he doesn't want questions on his economic policy. but one of the things that gets banded around here is if he's more interesting in addressing his legal issues. you know, my accepts from that is that actually, despite what's going on in the markets, the relative calm appearance right n
. >>> it was a budget day in hong kong. we'll head out east to get all the data as the city's poised to enjoy a return to higher growth. >>> and we fly tout singapore to speak to the global head of trade at hspc who think that the face of trade is changing as more high-end products are due to be exported out of emerging markets. >>> bides all of that -- besides all of that, the focus is on the auction in italy. that will hit the tape in an hour and ten minutes. how much will italy have to pay for its political impasse? rome looking to sell between three and four billion euros of a ten-year issue. this was the six-month auction producing the most since 2012, up around 50 basis points. this is where the euro is trading ahead of the auction. 130.79 where we stand currently. yesterday we were down at seven-week low of around 1,317 -- 1.3017. it's warned in italy that a loss of investor confidence could increase borrowing costs and reignite the debt crisis. as for italy's politicians, the leader of the center left coalition has vowed that he would try to form a government and seek an alliance that would re
a little bit more with tina ford, who is senior political analyst at citi. it's a shame we couldn't get the full information in. we've now got with the gridlock here, what is -- i know there are many options. what do you think is the most likely? is a fresh election more likely than us coupling together some kind of coalition? >> i don't think so. at least not yet. to address your question, the next government probably won't last its full five-year term. however, fresh -- >> what is the next government? >> well, we'll get to that. there's no mon date here for austerity. you have a fragmentation amongst political parties, cobbling together a coalition is going to be difficult. historically, a coalition takes three to four weeks and it's not likely to be any quicker with this result. we are looking in the short term in weeks and probably months of political uncertainty. we have presidential elections coming, too. but in terms of fresh elections, they can't happen as quickly as they did in greece where they happened a month later. >> bettrsani will be first up trying to form a government.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10